Banks

Here at Markets and Money we run a sceptical eye over the banks, the credit market and Aussie housing regularly to make sure you’re never vulnerable to the disasters bankers get themselves into all too often.

You’ll find out why central banks don’t always know as much as they let you think. You’ll be fully informed about Australia’s ‘Big Four’ banks too. They make up around a quarter of the Aussie share market index. Thanks to their privileged position the big four will continue to be a huge force behind the market.

We’ll keep you updated on whether bank stocks should be part of your portfolio (and the times when you should take your money and run).

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bitcoin
Why Bitcoin Is Better Than Cash at the Bank
We are caught up in a fiat currency system; where governments determine the value of your money, the banks and the government can do what they like. Whereas with bitcoin, banks can’t do what they like. And governments can’t control the value of the cryptocurrency either.
US fed stabbing investor in back
Will the Fed Stab Investors in the Back?
Warsh — who resigned as Fed governor in 2011 — says he’d like to get the Fed in position to fight the next downturn…by raising rates now. Instead of having investors’ backs…ready to buy assets when markets turn down…under Warsh, the Fed may become investors’ worst enemy.
central banks use phillips curver
Outdated Phillips Curve No Longer Useful for Central Banks
Central banks across the developed world are coming to grips with some difficult questions this year, such as why the Phillips curve is broken. Today, this oversimplified economic tool isn’t telling central banks what they want to see. And, gallingly, they are surprised about it.
debt crisis
The Global Debt Bells Are Tolling
The base of the debt pyramid now needs to expand at a multiple of $5 to achieve $1 of growth. If the global debt pyramid — somehow miraculously — is still standing in a decade’s time, it’ll take more than $8 of debt to register a positive reading on the GDP needle. This is madness.
price target
Dow 50,000? Why Not?!
Yes, reflation is coming. And yes, this is an economy that can’t tolerate higher inflation/interest rates. Then with no debt ceiling over Congress…and no hold-the-line president in the White House — the sky’s the limit. Dow 50,000! Why not?!
Australian interest rates
ANZ Economist Predicts Aussie Interest Rate Rise
For a while now, I’ve been convinced the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) wouldn’t increase interest rates any time soon. My reasoning is based on low income growth, households drowning in debt, and inflation showing little sign of hitting targets of 2–3%.
us economy interest rates
Will the Fed’s Stubbornness Cause a Collapse?
In 2017, the US Federal Reserve has lifted interest rates twice. Stronger employment is their argument to end their decade long bond buying rampage. However, while employment in the US continues to strengthen, inflation remains stubbornly low.
us federal reserve interest rates
Can the US Fed get out of this one?
The US Federal Reserve has left the interest rates unchanged at 1% to 1.25%. No surprise there. The thing is, there is something not quite right in the US economy, so the Fed is hesitant to make any sudden moves.
Australian interest rates
Profiting in a Low Interest Rate Environment
RBA released the minutes of their 5 September Monetary Policy Meeting. Various members of the RBA discussed topics ranging from employment to wage growth and housing activity, and what these could mean for interest rates going forward.
manipulating data
Australia’s Economy – The Twisted Tale
The problem is that central bankers favour official statistics. When you tweak and manipulate data to suit your agenda, the government has a much rosier outlook. One Aussie central banker likened the Aussie economy to an underperforming high school student, saying Australia is operating ‘below its potential’.
Aussie dollar news
Aussie Dollar Highs Amid Cautious Optimism
The dollar creeped higher against the greenback overnight, even peaking over US 80 cents at one stage. It came as the US dollar slid lower, and an uptick in commodity prices. It has since slid back under the US 80 cent mark, but some analysts believe it will rise again.